Posts Tagged ‘punk’

Active Minds

August 16, 2012

Image

Ветераны британского DIY хардкор-панка из Скарборо, графство Северный Йоркшир.

http://www.myspace.com/activemindspunk

Belarusian punk band members arrested for participating in an illegal rally.

February 15, 2010


Belarusian-language sources report that around 40 members of the Sayuz Palyakaw (which represents the country’s ethnic Polish minority and is not recognised by the authorities) were arrested on February 15 for participation in an illegal rally in Hrodna on February 10, 2010 which protested the treatment of the Polish minority and commemorated the 70th anniversary of deportation of the Polish inhabitants of Western Belarus to Siberia after it was occupied by the Soviet Army at the start of WWII. Apparently the activists were on their way to the town of Valozhin where a court case related to the grievances of the local Polish community was to be heard today.
Those arrested include the organisation’s Head Council chairman Andrei Pachobut and its press secretary Ihar Bantsar who were both sentenced to five days in gaol for their part in the action. Right after being sentenced Bantsar declared a hunger strike demanding to be released.
Pachobut used to be a bass player in the anarchist punk band DEVIATION which his brother Stas fronts. Bantsar is a singer with the Hrodna streetpunk band MISTER X.

Source.

BONDZINSKIY – the almost forgotten hardcore pioneers.

February 2, 2010


BONDZINSKIY, named after some mate of theirs, were among my most favourite local hardcore bands as I was just getting into the whole scene. Their music (self-described as ‘mournful gnash’) displayed a rather bizarre mix of influences, with some jazz and reggae leanings, and song had seriously intelligent, pissed off lyrics. Between 1993 and 2003 they have had a whole lot of lineup changes, with only the drummer Igor Mosin and bassist Dima Petrov being the regular participants in their musical bacchanals – their Sly & Robbie act has formed back in the mid-1980s in DURNOYE VLIYANIYE and even featured a stint with the local punk legends BRIGADNIY PORDYAD.

I’ve found an interview with Dima (who also played with Sergey Kuryokhin’s POP-MEKHANIKA, Nick Sudnik’s ZGA and in SPITFIRE for a bit) from cca. 2006 which had rather silly questions, so I chucked them out and translated what he had to say:

The band history is incredibly complicated and complex, by lineup as well as by creative progression. The story of all this disgrace has to be started, after all, from DURNOYE VLIYANIYE, where I met the drummer Igor Mosin, with whom as a constant rhythm section we have gradually morphed from one musical hypostasis into another.
DURNOYE VLIYANIYE formed sometime cca. 1988-1989 and played gothic new wave, successfully gigging in St. Petersburg and at all sorts of regional festivals in the ex-USSR. The band got played on the popular John Peel show on BBC and supported the famous SONIC YOUTH in Moscow.
In 1990 DURNOYE VLIYANIYE were invited to tour West Germany – the Berlin Wall, by the way, was still safe and sound. The tour involved playing with German punk and hardcore bands in 10 West German cities. This was when we got introduced to the grandiose music school known as hardcore – from the inside and fully. It can be said that this trip made a fundamental influence on our musical outlook. After encountering new sound, new approach, the energy of this music, we were swept away, shocked, charmed. These were the new unfamiliar ways, new horizons, new possibilities.
We were particularly inspired by FUGAZI, BAD BRAINS, NO MEANS NO, VICTIMS FAMILY. After we got home, we necessarily got an urge to enflesh these new ideas but as it is known, new ideas do not blossom in old soil. So Igor and I started to play new material and also seek new musicians who could organically co-exist with us in this musical space. As a result, the collective called BONDZINSKIY came into being. Over the years we played music with the likes of Andy Kordyukov (ex-MLADSHIYE BRATYA, 17 PILOTOV V OGNE), Gennadiy Larichkin (now the leader of BER-LINN), Sergei Sokolov (now in PRAVDA), Andrei Mashnin (MASHNINBAND), Andrei Gradovich (JUGENDSTIL, now 2VA SAMALIOTA), Roman Boiko, Ilya Orlov, Dan Gutsenko (and about half a dozen more – translator’s note).
The 1990s will remain for me probably the brightest stage of St. Peterburg’s music life. Many musicians outgrew the boundaries of the Leningrad Rock Club which by then degenerated to all-sufficient, closed caste structure which stank of officialdom with elitism and conspiracy of silence inherent in such a system.
The Rock Club somehow faded away – the new epoch started. On the basis of the just opened TaMtAm club an entire scene of great bands appeared: BIROTSEFALY, KHIMERA, ZVONKI, SPITFIRE, THE PAUKI, DOLPHINS, TEQUILAJAZZZ, 5 UGLOV etc. (sorry if I forgot someone).
As it seemed to me, no one thought about making money, commercial success, we played for ourselves, for our friends, because there was internal need for that. It was an atmosphere in which experimenting and NOT looking like a snob was natural. Those who played hardcore in the early nineties were very close-knit – not so much musically, rather it was the shared attitude to life.
Music, especially rock music, cannot live in isolation, without exchanging creative ideas. Any movement gradually chokes up on its own foam. What can be more disgusting than mass producing your own past? For me making headway was always crucial. Henry Rollins once said that the past doesn’t exist and you have to prove to yourself that you are still alive every day.
I haven’t got the slightest desire to analyse the music of BONDZINSKIY. Because depending on the mood I could fall either into self-glorification or self-condemnation. One thing that could be noted was that the riff structure of songs played a bad joke on the band. We could have easily turned each piece into 5 or 6 separate songs but we were just throwing ideas away. And also, we have made a conscious decision not to limit ourselves with any concepts, for us it was natural to combine styles that were practically incompatible. Sometimes it looked forced, sometimes it was fun but it was never banal.
Like every positive passionate phenomenon, hardcore will not die in the foreseeable future. As long as there is social tension in the world, the hardcore will be refilled with fresh blood of radical and not indifferent young people.
The old generation goes – the new generation comes, the process continues – everything is logical. Not everyone manages to keep the active attitude. However I am saddened by the fact that the social pathos is reduced. When I see a bloke who works as a bank manager and plays in his hardcore band in the evenings (instead of blowing up said bank), I feel sad.
Also, it seems to me that rivalry in the so-called alternative music has to stop. Unite, and unite some more, no matter what the style is. It’s such a pity that the concept of “people of goodwill” has vanished. I long for positive counteraction and confrontation with all the glossy, glamourous scene.
Lately everyone has been literally going nuts over the external attributes, often forgetting the inner world. A desire to look trendy turns into a sort of general hysteria. Unfortunately these sentiments are projected on the musical material, the music gets castrated, completely glossed over, everything is so clean and smooth that it makes me sick. The inner nerve disappears, the admissible filth which makes rock music what it is.
To be honest, I do not know [who our listener is]. While BONDZINSKIY was around, I knew about ten people who really liked it, and all of them were musicians. That’s why I was so surprised to be asked about ‘the legendary BONDZINSKIY.’
After existing for about 6 years (more like 10 – translator’s note), playing a number of gigs in Russia and abroad, releasing two albums (the 2nd one was recorded but not released – translator’s note), the band ceased to exist. We have probably exhausted our inner potential, and we got pretty much sick of each other. Now I’m working on a new project called GRANDSHUTTLEBANDA.
Naturally, it has nothing to do with hardcore. For me it’s a totally different style but I was always interested in doing something new. At the moment we have recorded an album but we are still looking for someone to put it out.

The aforementioned first album, “Lobovoi Mainstream,” can be downloaded here.

The second one, which DJ DNA from URBAN DANCE SQUAD mixed ended up never coming out but you can hear some stuff on BONDZINSKIY’s RealMusic page.

Some more links:
St. Petersburg Times interview (in English)
Post-Bondzinsky interview in SPT (in English)
Knives & Forks interview, in Russian
Muzykalnaja Gazeta interview, in Russian

Bio in Russian

A bit of self-promotion…

January 27, 2010

Can’t be bothered with a proper update, so just a self-congratulating quickie.

Cover by Sean Fitzpatrick.

Yes, there's a Medvedev somehwere.


One, yours truly has been interviewed by Danny O’Rawe in his zine Back2Front #5 which can be ordered at back2fron (a//e) riseup.net. I mostly mumble about politics and punk rock. It’s a great read although I haven’t yet finished reading it (gives you an idea of how bloody huge it is).

Also, a song by SVINOKOP (“Nikakogo Pozitiva,” a.k.a. “Only Hatred,” if you care to know) was used in a fairly random YouTube video documenting a protest in East Jerusalem.

If you google hard enough and will be able to stand some atrocious playing and immense amounts of blabbering about fascism in Russian you can see a live video of the same song which we played at the first gig with our new drummer. It’s quite raw but we intend to jam some more and put it out as a single. I kid you not.

SA-SA “Paskutinės Dainos”

January 18, 2010

SA-SA tape front cover

Front cover


This Lithuanian band is a truly weird, excellent and, alas, somewhat obscure example of the coveted East European punk rock. Macabre and merry in approximately equal measures, it is rather garage yet effective sounding. Cue organic-sounding keyboards throughout and occasional terrace-choir singalongs. Catchy tunes get their commercial potential squashed by moribund artwork, and hailing from where they did, in 1994, of all years, was perhaps a surefire way to remain (garage punk) unknowns. The tape was released by Tundra Records, and I remain clueless as to whether they had any other releases. They didn’t really have to; this is a masterpiece. I have no clue as to what they sang about, my non-existent Lithuanian is enough to catch enough mentions of the words like ‘death’ and ‘dying’ to put most grind bands to shame. The kind people at hardcore.lt uploaded the mp3s (in 2002), and I scanned the cover and the insert (it’s double-sided).

Been a while…

January 11, 2010

Hello blog.
Quite a bit of time has passed since the last update. I think the chief reason I wasn’t motivated is because my ability to listen to music in digital format has been hindered somewhat. It’s still hindered, I’m not making any grand promises, no nothing, if I can’t be bothered I simply have bigger and better things to do with my life. Hopefully I’ll get around to doing a proper music zine, and not one of those little anarchist papers, or this blog.

Drunk Nach Osten #2 cover

Drunk Nach Osten #2 cover


Paaya in Brno, Czech Republic, has been stealing my bread – he has finished 2nd issue of his English-language East European punk rock fanzine which can be downloaded as PDF / MP3 archive here. “Contains interviews with HUMAN ERROR (Hungary), Sanych from DEFECT IN INDUSTRY zine and ME4TEC (Belarus), GRAZHDANSKAYA OBORONA (Russia), CRITICA RADICALA (Germany/Romania); scene report from Ukraine, articles about HC/underground in Latvia and History of Czech punk (KECUP, A64), lots of reviews, lyrics and photos.” They are making print version with a proper CDR attached in the spring.
Profane Existence
Those with interest in MP3s and East European punk rock will find gratification in listening to Scairt Radio #09, January 11, 2010 which features Russian diy crust/d-beat punk scene & boozing with Jan from Kismet HC. The full list of songs that were played, as well as a download link, can be found here.
The soy milk of human kindness that runs through my veins directs me to provide you with something as cheerful as the English translation of the lyrics to DISTRESS song “Last Day of the Human Race” which you will have the pleasure to hear on the radio:

Days are numbered, the earth dies
As a living organism it closes the circle of life

Last day of the human race

For our sins, nature suffers
The earth doesn’t forgive such a mistake

Last day of the human race

I have quite some catching up to do.

WE BLEED CHARISMA – Minimum Rock ‘N’ Roll demo.

January 17, 2009

St. Petersburg’s WE BLEED CHARISMA had an extremely short career cca. 2005. To my knowledge, they only ever played one gig, at Deep Sound Club at that, with GOODOK and KYSHTYM-23, a KING-KONGS side project. That was for a reason, only one of the members is a native of this fine city – singer Pavel Sasin (‘TIL I DIE, DOTTIE DANGER) aka DJ Pablo Diablo. Kostya Severniy the drummer was originally from Severodvinsk where he fronted pop punk band VYSHKA. He later drummed in CUT’N’RUN and is now in WIDOWLAND, as well as playing as a solo act which I personally find rather distasteful. French guitarist Seb is a member of SLEEP TALKER and CALL ME LORETTA. I dunno where the seppo sheila (the term used ironically) Naomi who was a keyboardist played before or after WBC, can anyone clue me in? They recorded nine songs, of which only a couple were properly mixed (and consequently released on a bunch of compilations in Russia and France). No cover, no nothing, can’t even find a band photo. It is still good. The degree to which English was mastered by this lot (who didn’t sing in Russian) is obvious from the name. Uploaded by Kostya.

http://ifolder.ru/10069457

MESSER CHUPS don’t fail to amaze…

December 14, 2008

MESSER CHUPS

MESSER CHUPS


I went to a MESSER CHUPS gig last night, and was much amuzed. They’re one of my favourite local bands as far as recordings go but I wasn’t sure what the live version would be like. The tour videos that one of their CDs included were kind of, whatever, two blokes and a Bettie Page lookalike playing surf music with a video screen behind them projecting horror B-movie excerpts. But, well, the lookalike in question is named Zombie Girl. The playing – that of guitarist / bandleader Oleg Gitarkin (also in NOZH DLYA FRAU MUELLER), anyway – was extraordinary, huge sound, amazing technique. Their new drummer is Alexander Belkov of CHIKISS. Finally, there was one extra bloke on stage that night – Alexander Skvortsov (DURNOYE VLIYANIYE) did a few songs now and then. They were all in rather scary-sounding English. I take it he’s gonna be on the band’s next album but I dunno when that would materialise. They’ve got the whole greaser aesthetic down.
Oh, and speaking of Bettie Page, MESSER CHUPS’ cover of “The Model” by KRAFTWERK was dedicated to her memory.

Official website
MySpace

My five cents…

October 11, 2008

Lunatic Fridge

Lunatic Fridge


An interview with yours truly can be found here:
http://www.kobayashi-disko.org/eng/Info_StPetersburgDIY.htm
It seems that the comrades have translated their own translation of the original English-language interview back from German, alas. As is mentioned, it’s printed in the October issue of Trust zine in Germany. Another interview, conducted over email and translated into French should be in Ratcharge #14 but I haven’t seen it yet.
Ratcharge 14 cover

Ratcharge 14 cover

RIVUSCHIYE STRUNY – Live in St. Petersburg.

March 30, 2008

One of Russia’s top bands for me, RIVUSCHIYE STRUNY, have made a trip down to St. Petersburg this weekend. Unfortunately, I missed their gig at GEZ altogether and only caught the last couple of songs they played at Zoccolo, but it was enough to send me to crawl and convulse on the floor. I borrowed money, bought a t-shirt, borrowed a marker and had the shirt signed by guitarist Alexei Bortnichuk. Alex Volkov filmed both shows, and posted clips online.

“San Frantsysko” live from Zoccolo:

And some stuff from GEZ, with a random audience member swapping his beer for a chance to play Bortnichuk’s guitar:

And here’s what I had to say about the band’s second CD when asked to do so by Pulse magazine for its November 2007 issue:

RIVUSCHIYE STRUNY

“Maskovskaya Riznya Elektra Gitarami – Chyast #1 (1970)”

(Otdeleniye Vykhod)

I would say that this band is the closest that Moscow got to the genius that is the Stooges since “Moskovskiye Kanikuly” album by Nick Rock’n’Roll & Lolita. Some seventeen years have passed since then, garage rock is now trendy, and Iggy Pop himself has blessed Russia’s capital city with his appearances twice. Iggy and the Stooges have actually played there about three weeks before this CD was released. Anyway, the Rivuschiye Struny (Houling Strings) member with the most impressive CV would be one of their guitar players, Alexei Bortnichuk, formerly a member of Zvuki Mu and Mamonov I Alexei. His stardom, however, doesn’t overshadow the other band members. Although, like almost every record with at least a distant smell of real rock and roll, this is primarily a guitar album (the title means something like “The Moscow Electric Guitar Massacre,” albeit with a whole bunch of misspellings). But the energy, drive and imagination of the other members are impossible to miss in the raw, “simple” recording, and Vova Terekh’s poetry is rather brilliant as it is, despite the similarity of subject matter – the life of 1970s hippies / criminals – to that of Zvuki Mu’s Pyotr Mamonov and DK’s Sergei Zharikov. Well, I wouldn’t say that an attempt to imagine what “Fun House” would’ve sounded like in the Soviet Union sounds like a trendy kinda thing, but it’s defo TRUUUUUUE!

It was a five-star review, needless to say.

http://www.unitedsoundart.ru/projects/rs